Venezuelan women

Duration: 13min 43sec Views: 1994 Submitted: 10.06.2019
Category: Double Penetration
Humanitarian crises are never gender neutral, and the ongoing humanitarian crisis in Venezuela is no exception. Conflicts inherently affect women and men differently, and the Venezuelan crisis has had significant impacts on female Venezuelans inside and outside the country. Although girls and women have been disproportionately affected, little has been done to deliberately address gender-specific issues. From higher levels of unemployment than men to poor access to education and health services, women often find themselves in disadvantaged positions in Venezuela. Historically, most Venezuelan women have worked within the home.

Venezuelan Women Confront State Violence

Women in Venezuela - Wikipedia

A Venezuelan woman holds a box containing products for sale as she lines up for a free lunch at the "Divina Providencia" migrant shelter on the outskirts of Cucuta, at the Colombian-Venezuelan border February 20, In response to the ongoing humanitarian crisis, and the political and economic instability in the country, approximately 5. Among the victims of this crisis, there is one group in society that has been disproportionately affected by the ever-changing situation and by the difficult decision to migrate—Venezuelan women. Although gender inequality is not a novel issue in Latin America and especially not in Venezuela, the current humanitarian crisis has made women more vulnerable financially, politically, and socially, and made sexual violence and discrimination commonplace. Women have historically been one of the main beneficiaries of economic and social government programs in Venezuela that aim to fight poverty and promote social inclusion. However, as the economic crisis continues to worsen, Venezuelans have increasingly relied on these programs to gain access to minimum levels of income and food.

Center for Strategic & International Studies

Jump to navigation. When the police kill young men in Venezuela, often their mothers are the only ones who seek justice. Institutional barriers to accountability have increased during the pandemic. Cristina heard the shots that killed her son.
But, now with the pandemic, we are in limbo, we are stuck in Colombia , and hungry again. We have gone from one crisis to another. An estimated 4. And as refugees, it is women who have been the most vulnerable to labour and sexual exploitation, trafficking and violence. The backbone working class marched out of Venezuela largely on foot, their worldly possessions stuffed into black bin liners or rolled behind them in suitcases, travelling along arterial roads and highways to cross the borders — legally and illegally — into countries now shouldering the crisis.