Adult lazy eye treatment

Duration: 12min 19sec Views: 1647 Submitted: 01.10.2020
Category: Double Penetration
Do you squint while reading or working on the computer? Do you struggle with depth perception when playing tennis, reaching out to hit that tennis ball? If you are noticing constant eye strain or headaches along with blurred or double vision, you may have a condition called amblyopia. Simply stated, amblyopia happens when the vision in one of the eyes is reduced because the eye and the brain are not working together in harmony.

Research Shows Adults Can Be Treated for Amblyopia

Vision Therapy for Adults

Treatment options for adults with amblyopia isn't magic. It is real and based on science. For decades there has been a belief among eye doctors that if a patient had amblyopia AKA "lazy eye" , it was untreatable after childhood. Whether the cut-off age was 6 years old, 8 years old, or 10 years old, it was assumed that after that age, it was pointless to try to improve the vision in the "lazy" eye. It was thought that even if the vision did improve, it would just worsen again after treatment stopped. By definition, it is not caused by disease or injury, but instead develops when the brain does not get enough visual stimulation to use both eyes together.

How to Correct a Lazy Eye

Any or all of these issues in combination can lead to amblyopia. Fortunately, there are treatments that improve eye coordination and strengthen the muscles of the eyes. Treatments are more effective the earlier the condition is diagnosed. After a child reaches 8 years old, on average, the likelihood of vision improvement with treatment drops significantly. About 1.
It was long thought that treating amblyopia, the medical term for lazy-eye, after the "critical age" of years old was not possible. Unfortunately, many optometrists and ophthalmologists still believe, refer to, and share this outdated view. Research, clinical trials, and well-documented patient cases, now show that amblyopia can be treated well into adult hood. In an excerpt from Stereopsis and amblyopia : A mini-review. Levi et al explain, "Brain plasticity is known to peak during a critical period in early childhood and to decrease thereafter Bavelier et al.